"Using what I’ve learnt from the TIE lectures, the youth entrepreneurship panel and the stimulus TechCrunch disrupt activity, I decided to start the GirlsforCS initiative to encourage more girls to study computer science."

TIE 2016
Trinity Donohugh
United Kingdom

This summer, I spent two weeks at the Yale Young Global Scholars Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship session at Yale University. I chose to attend this program due to my love for computer science and technology as well as my passion for politics. This session was memorable, intellectually challenging, and engaging from start to finish – not just because of the fascinating seminars, lectures and stimulus activities, but most importantly, because of the attendees.

Throughout the program, I was amazed by what I learnt from other students, who came from all around the world. As someone who has always loved keeping track of global news events, I cherished the opportunities to hear first-hand perspectives from classmates who were living through various momentous events that I had previously only read about in the news. This has been a turbulent year around the world and since our program was right after the BREXIT vote, in the middle of the US presidential election, immediately after the coup in Turkey, and during protests in Brazil to impeach and remove President Dilma Rousseff, this meant that heated debates were inevitable. I remember having debates about the US election, discussions about BREXIT and the future of the EU, and so many other issues at every opportunity we had. You’re probably now wondering why we were talking so much about politics during a TIE program. Well, there was also a fair share of discussion on technology, innovation and entrepreneurship, especially regarding what AI means for our future and the threat of the emeragence of chat bots influencing our views and decisions. Politics and technology do go really well together!

The one thing I will never forget from this program is what Professor Jensen taught us in our first lecture, that a business is only successful if it solves an existing problem. One problem that TIE has inspired me to address is the relative gender disparity in STEM fields like computer science. As an avid coder, I’ve noticed that there are few girls who are interested in programming – a trend that is statistically evident across much of the world. Using what I’ve learnt from the TIE lectures, the youth entrepreneurship panel and the stimulus TechCrunch disrupt activity, I decided to start the GirlsforCS initiative to encourage more girls to study computer science.

As I work on this new venture, I can truly appreciate how TIE was a life-changing experience. The program encouraged me to make use of every opportunity I have; it has motivated to be more willing to take risks and pursue my goals even if I face challenges and setbacks. I look forward to seeing how the lessons I’ve drawn from TIE will continue to be useful as I aim to harness the power of technology and innovation to deal with existing and future problems in our society.

Popular Posts