"The resources we had during our time at Yale were endless as well. Tours of the Yale Law School, entry into the Sterling Memorial Library, workouts at the Payne Whitney gymnasium and access to Yale's countless databases were all available to us as Young Global Scholars."

TIE 2016
Angie Luo
Canada

Walking into the gates of Jonathan Edwards College on a hot summer day, I had no idea what I was about to get myself into. I was going to be at Yale for two weeks for a program called Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship and signed up for seminars that talked about everything from GMO's to self-control, privacy to drones. But what did that all really mean?

My apprehensions were dismissed very early on. After arriving in the morning, I said goodbye to my parents and was caught in a group of girls who, like me, had hours to spare before the program started later in the afternoon. My always overly emotional mother was worried to leave me in another country for two weeks, but I could see her sad expression quickly fade away as I immediately made friends. "Hi, I'm Jocelyn!" "I'm Jocelyn, too!" "I'm Thao!" "Hey, I'm Annie!" One of the best parts of YYGS were the introductions because the most common conversation starter was, "So, where are you from?" Australia, South Korea, England, Spain, Nigeria, Scotland, Brazil, Singapore and every corner of the United States were answers that I would grow accustomed to over the next two weeks.

As the program kicked off, my days were filled day to night with lectures, seminars, pool games, trips to Insomnia Cookies with friends and engaging conversations on hammocks.

The lectures held in the beautiful William L. Harkness Hall were about subjects such as the impacts of innovation and design, social enterprises, and the power of memory. They were always followed by smaller discussion groups where there were no boundaries and the discussion often took interesting turns into subjects such as stocks, shoes or schools. Two entrepreneurship panels took place where people who were not much older than ourselves and had started their own business, shared their experiences and advice with us. Throughout the program, we worked on capstone projects that honed our ability to pitch a project, think on our feet and work together. My favourite aspect of the entire program was by far the simulation that took place through the first weekend. A fake business bubble was created but real companies, such as Sequoia Capital, Google, TechCrunch, and Bumble were represented. All 211 of us had a role to play: making deals, building pitch decks, reporting the news or choosing the best startup.

The resources we had during our time at Yale were endless as well. Tours of the Yale Law School, entry into the Sterling Memorial Library, workouts at the Payne Whitney gymnasium and access to Yale's countless databases were all available to us as Young Global Scholars.

Outside of what the TIE program planned for us, I was able to discover New Haven with new friends, building relationships with people from all over the world. Last minute trips to Good Nature Market to make guacamole, rap battles in the courtyard and epic ping-pong showdowns were all things that I could have never imagined I would experience in the now seemingly extremely brief time I spent at Yale. These days, my YYGS badge still hangs in my room and pictures of the friends I made continue to pop into my feed, making me miss the program and the amazing, wonderful, intelligent and brilliant others I met. It's an experience that I will always cherish and never forget.

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